From MTV News: 7 Facts You Didn’t Know About Selena Gomez’s ‘Same Old Love’

By Emilee Lindner

Selena Gomez’s “Same Old Love” video follows the singer rolling through the city in a raindrop-speckled car, observing life from safely inside.

But after watching life go on around her, she’s ready to immerse herself in the human experience, so she ditches the car, which continues on to her concert empty. Don’t worry though, after drifting around city streets and a nightclub — something that she wouldn’t get to do in real life without fans and paparazzi smothering her — she runs back to the venue on foot to make it to her concert on time.

For the fans who got the first look of the video at Gomez’s Revival album event in L.A. last week, that’s where they thought it ended. But little did they know that Selena would come out for a surprise performance, and their reactions would be filmed for the end of the video, released on Tuesday.

We got on the phone with Michael Haussman, who directed “Same Old Love” — along with Justin Timberlake’s “SexyBack,” Madonna’s “Take A Bow,” Kanye West’s “Jesus Walks” and more — to get the behind-the-scenes stories that went into the carefully crafted visual.

Read the full article on MTV.com


News from Huffington Post: Selena Gomez Teams With Fans for New Music Video

Wednesday night, Selena Gomez invited fans to sit in the audience of the Palace Theater in Downtown Los Angeles with the promise of having them be part of the video shoot for her latest single, “Same Old Love”. The song would be the second song of her upcoming album, Revival.

Once the house lights went out, a giant screen descended on stage and began showing the “Same Old Song” video, directed by Michael Haussman. We were all curious – if we were there to be part of the shoot, why were we watching the finished product?

But the surprise was still to come.

In the video, Selena is being driven in a town car, where she sits in the back seat, singing the song as rain pours down the nighttime city. Her ultimate destination is still unknown at this point.

After observing enough brokenhearted people during her ride, which she subsequently abandons, it becomes clear that in the video Selena is expected to be at a concert venue for her own performance. There is panic by her handlers when the town car arrives with no Selena in sight.

Never fear, all is not lost. Though we’re not sure why she decided to take a pedestrian detour, Selena arrives at the back door of the venue just in the nick of time. We see her glam squad put the finishing touches on her already flawless face as her stressed out handlers guide Selena through the dark and narrow path of the theater halls and on to the curtained stage.

Then, in a seamless transition, as the curtain in the video begins to lifts and expose the audience, the actual video screen on the Palace Theater stage rises and there in front of us — as if she popped out of her own video — is Miss Gomez herself, singing the chorus of the song right on cue. It’s like she was there all along — same dress, same hairdo, same everything. The crowd went wild, and the camera crew was there to capture the genuinely excited and surprised fans sitting — actually now standing at their feet — in the theater, going nuts. (And yes, it was done in one take. No stops and starts or repeats.)

Afterward, a chair was brought to the stage and Selena sat down and began a heartfelt speech. She thanked her fans for always being there for her, told them how much she adores them, and how this is a new stage in her life which includes a switch to new record label with Revival.

Read more on Huffington Post


Rolling Stone: Madonna’s 20 Greatest Music Videos – Take a Bow – Michael Haussman

Express Yourself: The Making of Madonna’s 20 Greatest Music Videos

Since first storming MTV in 1983 with the poetic, lo-fi “Burning Up,” Madonna’s music videos have spent more than 20 years sparking conversations about fashion, feminism, sex, religion and what you could and could not show on television. To help her realize these 67 clips — one of the most rapidly changing visions in pop history — she teamed up with some video and photography’s most celebrated artists, including David Fincher, Jean-Baptiste Mondino, Herb Ritts, Mark Romanek, Chris Cunningham, Stéphane Sednaoui, Jonas Åkerlund, Luc Besson and more.

“Madonna was the one you had to get,” says Michael Hausmann, director of her mid-Nineties clips for “Take a Bow” and “You’ll See.” “That was the video that would be the most airtime. It was, in some ways, kind of more important than having a movie out. More people were watching it, that’s for damn sure.”

To celebrate our cover star, we caught up with many of the directors behind some of the most iconic (and controversial) images in music history.

Remembers director Michael Haussman about this love story filmed in Spain, “She said, ‘OK, Here’s the song: It’s about a girl in love with a public figure. Write something, but just don’t make it dark.’ So, of course I went and wrote something really dark.” Madonna and the director met at the Ritz in Paris, tabled the discussion about his dark idea until dinner and started making small talk. “She says, ‘Well, what have you been doing?’ And I said, ‘Well, I’ve been really into filming bullfights and stuff.’ And I just saw this sparkle in her eye and suddenly I just kind of went with it. Pretty sure the while thing was written [that] night.” The sepia tinged video mixes shots of real life bullfighter Emilio Muñoz with Madonna for a clip that’s sensual, majestic and features steamy footage of the pop star writhing in front of a TV. “I thought it was going to be [difficult to direct] but then it was one of the sexiest things that I’ve ever seen,” says Haussman. “She would just play the song through and go for it.”

Michael Haussman, director: It became epic in proportions to try and actually do that video because it was such a taboo subject. There were several times when it was gonna be cancelled because of PETA getting involved, saying, “We understand you’re going to film a bullfight?” And originally I was. I was gonna try to film a bullfight where the bull gets killed and everything, and that was kind of the idea to stay true to it. And [it] became kind of obvious…we can’t stage a bullfight for a Madonna video, that’s not going to go across too well….And sure enough, it was such a fiery topic that we had to have to have the police in my office in London opening our mail because a lot of animal rights groups send letterbombs to scientists and things. The producer had a rose taped to his door and it said, “Hasta la vista, baby!” All kinds of really scary shit. I had to check under hotel under different names, which I’ve never had to do, when I was in Spain.

The bullfighting world didn’t want anything to do with someone that’s gonna come in and [try to be] commercializing them. What helped was that I had a super passion about it…I knew enough that I could say, “Listen: I want Emilio Muñoz and I can tell you about every fight he had last year, every outfit he wore and where he fought.” It was kind of funny because everyone said, “Well, he’ll never do it, Emilio Muñoz — why don’t you look at these other guys that are seeking publicity. And those are the guys you didn’t want! So that was a whole trip in itself — literally sitting in hotels in Seville, waiting to meet this guy. Waiting for four days passing — and it’s only his guys coming to scope you out and see if it’s real and it wasn’t some television show where they do pranks on people.

One thing we had to promise was that we’d never harm the bull in any way. And that became a real touchy subject because a bullfighter can’t really fight a bull unless he’s been harmed in some way. Usually they do a pick to his shoulder and that makes his head go down so that he could go use the smaller, red cloth called a muleta. So, if suddenly, we were not able to pick him or have any trace of blood on the bull, so how is he supposed to use this red cloth? She was set to fly out in two days and he was set to come the following day — it was right down to the wire. So I posed him the problem and he didn’t really say anything except, “OK, let me think about this.” And he just kind of of disappeared for two days. No one could get him on the phone. She gets on an airplane to come out. So, the drama was just fantastic! So he finally arrives and says, to the Spanish press, “I’m going to fight this bull, I’m not going to pick or bandeira him. it’s going to be the first time it’s ever done and I’m going to do it. I’m going to do it for my friend Michael.”

I don’t think [the bullfighting community] ever really wanted it to get out because he was able to fight that bull fine and it was beautiful and the bull never got hurt…at all. But you have to understand the reason that can’t happen is, unfortunately, [bullfighting is] about the celebration about killing of a bull. So it kind of took away the reason it why it exists for the Spanish. And also, when you’re looking at the footage, it’s pretty outstanding what he does. He’s not just fighting it — he’s fighting it beautifully. It’s gorgeous. It was all cloaked in secrecy. He wouldn’t do it unless no one saw. It was just too weird that a bullfighter’s fighting a bull that’s not picked or bandeira’d

Read more: Express Yourself: The Making of Madonna’s 20 Greatest Music Videos – Take a Bow – Michael Haussman